Friday, February 8, 2019

Baby's First Video Editor: Google Slides

Google Slides is my best friend. Really. Slides and I go way back. We've been teaching together longer than I can even remember. It's weird though, sometimes you learn something new about your best friend, and things are never the same. That's how things are between Google Slides and I since I learned about it's video editing capabilities.

That's right. Google Slides is an epic video editing tool. It's especially great for younger students. That's because slides can:
  • Embed videos directly from your Google Drive without having to upload to YouTube or other hosting sites.
  • Can be clipped down to just the segment of the video you want to share
  • You can play two videos at once to simulate "tracks". Have your video in the foreground and shrink another video in the margins that will play your background music.
  • Implement design elements like clipart, wordart, or the other tools available in Slides/Drawings to design layouts and overlays to surround your video
  • You can publish a video slide to the web so it can be shared as simply as you might share a YouTube video
Inserting a video is crazy easy. All you have to do is click Insert -> Video and find the video you'd like to work with in your Drive. 


Next, you can get into the different options you have for editing. Simply click on the video, and select the "Video options" tab above.


There's not a lot of editorial control you have here, but what you have is pretty useful. First is the clipping option. By using the "Start at/End at" functions, you can clip out sections of the video you don't want to appear in the final product. For example:

Raw File:

Edited/Published Video: 

That's useful for a multitude of reasons. First, most kids aren't one take creators. That means sometimes they are going to need to try to record a few times before they get it just right. This allows them to keep the camera running without having to worry about going back and deleting/rerecording every time they make a mistake. Also, if your students do screencasts or other recordings on their devices that require navigating or menuing during recording, this is a simple way to remove those parts of the video.

The other options you'll have available are simple enough. Autoplay when presenting plays the video automatically when the slide is in presentation mode. This can be a good idea when you are sharing a Slides video by publishing it to the web. Just send the publish to web link and you'll have a video that will start as soon as you click the link. I use this a lot, but add a title slide with directions to start the video. 

Mute audio will remove audio while the video plays. I don't use this too much since in creative tasks we have a lot of use for our audio with either dialogue, narration, or explanatory language. But there would be uses if you were wanting to record a separate track for music or narration.

By understanding these three editing tools, you can really start to do some interesting and creative things.

For example, when telling a story, you could have each slide be a different scene. Have the videos autoplay and go into presentation mode. Now you have a movie.


Since Slides doesn't let you set custom times, you can't let it let the slides auto-advance, which is a bummer. You'll need to either click through the slides yourself, or publish to the web like I did here so the viewer can navigate the scenes. It's not a perfect way to record multiple scenes, but it's a good basic start for those that aren't expert video editors.

Now let's talk about tracks. Since Slides has a free-form editor, it's possible to have multiple videos playing on a slide at the same time. For this reason, you can do stuff like this:


We have used this like you see above -- to have a background track with someone discussing what is happening in the foreground. News reports, storytelling, music videos. Again, there are tons of options.


Sync up a background track by inserting the music you want to use from a YouTube video, and shrinking the video down small enough that you can't really see it. It'll still play full audio, even if it's not visible.



Another pretty cool thing to add to the scene is using the shapes and word art to create digital settings to frame your videos. I did this in the lion video above. I have also done this to have kids create their own news channels, or just to add to the setting of a story they are telling. You should know that embedded video ignore layers, however. This means you can't put still images or shapes on top of a playing video -- it will just smash everything below and the video will set on top.


As you can see, there are tons of things you can do once you know how to mess with the video options in Google Slides. And the best part is, you don't have to be a digital media wizard. If you can record a video and edit with Google Slides, you can make some swag projects quickly and easily. It'd be great to see what you guys create with these powerful tools.

Friday, January 18, 2019

Talkin' Heads w/ Google

One of my favorite projects to do with kids is to show them out to make Google Slides animations. And one of my favorite projects to animate is your very own talking head!

So how do we do it?

First you need to set up a fresh new Google Slide deck and you need to take a picture of your pretty little face. One thing that makes this tricky is that Google recently ditched the "Take a snapshot" feature from Google Slides. So while you used to be able to take a picture directly into Slides, now you have the extra step of inserting a picture from your computer. I highly recommend Alice Keeler's Webcam Snapshot, which takes a webcam snap and uploads it directly to your Google Drive.


[[UPDATE 2/1/18]] Take a snapshot is BAAAAACK! Yes!!! Makes this project a bit easier.


From there all you'll need to do is add the image to your slide from Google Drive.

Now you'll want to crop the background out of the image -- I like to use the oval crop tool to get as close as I can to isolating the head shape.


Then we need to create a mouth flap and a mouth color. The way I do this is by creating a copy of the face and cutting down a section that will move. I always put a solid color behind the mouth flap as well:


Now that all your layers are in place, you just need to copy the slide and move the mouth flap incrementally for each new frame.


Now you're talkin'.

Now you add something like a screen recorder (my recommendation is Screencastify) and you are creating your own animations, cartoons, and movies.




You can do this with anything -- it doesn't have to be your mouth. You can wave hands, have the wind blow your hat off, or dance a jig. The real beauty of a project like this is that you are showing students how to harness the tool -- now they can create whatever they want with it. The genius is the simplicity.






Friday, October 26, 2018

Create Custom Art with Google Drawings

Some people never truly understand how amazing Google Drawings is. From the get go, it seems kind of boring. You just get that blank checkboard background. The tools aren't conducive to drawing. It's sterile.

All of that is true. But that simplicity is always what makes Google Drawings sooooo amazing. One thing I use to teach students how to get familiar with design and the functions of creating drawings is to have them create their own derivative art using images in Google Drawings.

The secret sauce is this guy:


The Polyline Tool! (you should be imagining that with a big, deep, echoing voice because this thing will CHANGE YOUR LIFE.) Let me show the ways.

First we are going to open up Google Drawings and just drop in any ordinary picture from the internet.


Now we are going to use the Polyline tool to "mask" over the image. This will give us a rough version of the picture that we can then start to touch up with our own personalization.


For this car, I'll use some circles to complete the wheels. I'll also flip through the layers to get the window shapes and some of the trim. After working for a while you'll have a whole mess of shapes that will soon become your own pretty little creation.


The final step is to go in, color it up, adjust your shapes, and add any extra details. This car needs a sweet lightning bolt down the side. You'll also want to delete your original starting image from behind your new creation.


Finally you'll want to group these shapes together to create a cohesive whole. This will let you move, stretch, resize, copy, paste -- all sorts of other things like it was any other image.


So that's it! This is such an amazing hack -- I have used this for countless classroom applications -- creating characters for stories, objects for animations, original images for presentations, I use this at home to have my daughters design their own princesses and castles. I have even used this exact technique to help my wife design a shirt for the staff in her office. There are truly thousands of applications for this, in and out of the classroom. 

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Lazy

One of the best vocabulary lessons you'll ever get is the one where you teach yourself the difference between "lazy" and "unmotivated". When it comes to students, when they aren't getting things done or it seems like they don't care, we are quick to call them lazy. But is that really the case?

Laziness is physical. Most of our students are actually experiencing a psychological problem -- lack of motivation.

The vocabulary we use to explain this behavior is important. In our mind if a student is lazy, it ends the conversation. You can't get over that.

Unmotivated suggests there is a source to the lack of effort they give in your classroom.

One of these things has a solution. One doesn't. If our students are unmotivated, it simply becomes a case of finding the motivation. Looking for something that moves that student. Building the relationship that makes them care.

So, whether you are discussing student issues in the teachers lounge or are simply processing internally what a student's issue might be, remember to check your vocabulary.




Wednesday, August 15, 2018

EdTech PodSquad Goes Back to School!

Hey, Podcast fans! The latest episode of the EdTech PodSquad is up! We have a great conversation about back to school and starting something new in your school district. Check it out below!

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Stop Talking Tech, Start Talking Shop

I've been doing this tech coaching thing for a while now, and recently I have come to a profound understanding about what I do.

People don't care that much about technology.

At first I this kind of bothered me. I told myself, "I do big important things! People love me! The things I care about have a profound impact!" I mean, these things ARE TRUE. But the real point I'm making here isn't that people don't find value in what I do--It's that teachers don't necessary want to sit around and shoot the breeze about technology integration in their classroom.

They don't want to talk tech. They want to talk about learning experiences.

Sometimes technology is an important part of that. And that's where I come in. This year I have tried to fundamentally change the perception of my role from "That tech guy" to more of a pedagogical mentor. My angle is tech, but our conversations need to be about TEACHING. Here's how I try to structure my conversations:

1. Ask more Questions

When I walk into a classroom, I should not consider my job to be a technology expert. I need to be a master teacher and a learning partner. I need to ask questions to understand what we're trying to do in the classroom today. The technology could absolutely make what happens today better, but why are we starting there? Let's drill down to the objectives of the unit, lesson, or activity. What do we need to get done? Now let's talk tech.

2. Focus on Instructional Goals

Through conversation we need to get to a place where we have a specific learning activity to focus on. Rather than walking in with an agenda of "cool tech tools" we should look at the goals for students first, and then plan the experiences around that. Once the components of the lesson are decided upon, then we should start talking about how technology supports those experiences. Are we collaborating? Creating? Publishing to the world? All of those things present amazing opportunities for technology integration. But the learning must come first.

3. Respect Class Time

If we are jumping in feet first with a tech enhanced project, we should understand that changes the timeline. If a teacher wants a students to make a video, we must allow for the extra time that will take plus the time needed to simply gain comfort with the new tool. Yes, there is a profound impact in having students publish video versions of written assignments, but are we going to spend 80% of the time we have on the project learning how to trim clips and insert background music? If I am singularly focused on being the tech integrator, it would be easy to allow something like that to spoil the actually student learning. And sometimes teacher's have no idea what you're getting them into. Be transparent about the time you are asking them to sacrifice.

This is the tip of the iceberg when it comes to instructional coaching, but in the long run shifting the ways you have these conversations can make a big differences in the quality of tech integration you get with teachers and students.